“How to avoid and treat running injuries”

Although one of the most popular and convenient ways to stay fit, running is also one of the easiest ways for you to develop an injury. The impact and stress of running can be hard on your muscles and joints, commonly resulting in injuries to your hips, knees, ankles, and feet.

How to Avoid Running Injuries?

There are several simple techniques to help you avoid running injuries.

  • Perform a Warm Up & Cool Down. You may have specific stretches that have been prescribed by your physio—your warm up/down is an ideal time to per-form them. However, general static stretching is not as effective as once thought. A better method of warming up is to start very gently—perhaps with a walk—and gradually increase your pace.
  • Wear appropriate footwear suitable to your foot structure. Recent research indicates that softer, pad-ded footwear may actually be worse for your joint than a harder sole. Keep this in mind when buying your next pair of shoes.
  • If your foot has biomechanical problems, you would probably benefit from orthotics, which can be fitted on-the-spot at either of our PhysioWorks clinics.
  • Avoid over training – ask us for advice. As a general rule, do not increase your training by more than 10% each week. Do not try to beat your previous times every day! Take it easy, enjoy yourself, and gradually get into the habit of running.
    running injuries
    Common running injuries

Early Warning Signs of Impending Injury

If an ache or pain develops, do not ignore the early warning signs. While some injuries can be immediately evident, others slowly and progressively get worse, making it even more important to act early before chronic problems develop. So what are the early warning signs you should look for?

  • Joint pain: Pain that lasts longer than 48 hours needs physiotherapy diagnosis.
  • Tenderness: If pressing your finger into a specific point causes pain, and the same pain is not produced on the opposite side of the body, please ask for advice.
  • Swelling: Usually obvious, swelling often co-exists with pain and heat. The area will feel “full”.
  • Reduced Range of Motion: Compare with opposite side of body.
  • Weakness: Perform tasks on both sides of body to identify weakness.

Other warning signs that you have overtrained include

  1. Pain that does not go away when you warm up
  2. Aching that persists for more than 30 minutes after you have cooled down, or
  3. Stiffness and pain the following morning.

If you experience any of these signs or symptoms, please give us a call. We will save you months of pain and frustration. We’ll have you back jogging pain free again in no time!

For more information on running injuries, please see http://www.physioworks.com.au/Injuries-Conditions/Activities/running-injuries or visit us directly at http://www.physioworks.com.au/Bulimba/bulimba.htm or http://www.physioworks.com.au/Mansfield/mansfield.htm

 

 

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